Buffy-tufted-ear Marmoset Callithrix aurita

These enchanting and charismatic tiny monkeys have a distinct “gothic” appearance. They live deep in the forests of a tiny area of Brazil. Buffy-tufted-ear Marmosets are also known as buffy tufted-ear mamosets or the white-eared marmosets. They are New World monkeys living in a geographically isolated region in the Atlantic coast that has been decimated for palm oil, soy and cattle ranching agriculture and mining.

Spectacled Bear Tremarctos ornatus

Spectacled bears are known as the ‘peaceful and gentle bear’. They are the only bear living in the tropics of South America. Like many other animals in tropical ecosystems they are endangered. They get their name from their eye-catching markings around their eyes, face and neck that resemble spectacles. Each bear has unique markings like a fingerprint and some bears don’t have them at all.

They are found throughout the thin line of Peruvian rainforest and their range stretches across several countries: Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela and Colombia. Their main threats are habitat loss to mining, logging, cattle farming, palm oil and soy as well as hunting. Protect them each time you shop by boycotting meat and palm oil in the supermarket.

Kaapori Capuchin Cebus kaapori

The Kaapori capuchin is on a knife-edge of survival – they are critically endangered. In 2017 their population had been decimated by 80% due to deforestation for agriculture including soy, cattle grazing and palm oil. Part of the gracile genus of capuchin monkeys, Kaapori (also known as ka’apor) capuchins have longer limbs in comparison to their body size. They weigh around 2-3 kilos. Compared to other capuchin species, they have rounder skulls and musculature supporting their teeth and jaws means that they can’t open hard nuts. To get at insects living inside of trees they break branches with their teeth and hands in order to reach the ants inside. They also smash snails against trees in order to crack their shells open.

Giant Otter Pteronura brasiliensis

The agile and graceful tumbling Olympians of the Amazonian rivers, Giant Otters are able to swim 100 metres in less than 30 seconds. They are also known as the Lobo de Rio (the River wolf), Los Lobos del Rio (Wolves of the River) and Ariranha. They are most active in the mornings and evenings and take a siesta during the hottest parts of the day.

The most significant threats to giant otters are anthropogenic pressures of deforestation for palm oil, soy and meat, pollution from mining and climate change. They are also illegally hunted and traded for their pelts or killed in retribution by fishermen.

Jaguar Panthera onca

Jaguar populations are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation for palm oil, soy and meat along with illegal murder for trophies/illegal trade in body parts. They are also the victims of pro-active or retaliatory killings associated with livestock depredation and competition for wild meat with human hunters.

Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis

Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis Extant (resident) Ecuador; Peru Critically Endangered The Ecuardorian White-fronted Capuchin is affected by deforestation and hunting for bushmeat and the pet trade. Forests in the western lowlands of Ecuador have been severely reduced in the past half-century (Dodson and Gentry 1991, Sierra 2013, Gonzalez-Jaramillo 2016). Where habitat loss has fragmentedContinue reading “Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis”

Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin Cebus malitiosus

Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin Cebus malitiosus Endangered Colombia The Santa Marta white-fronted capuchin is threatened in Colombia by habitat loss and fragmentation due to cattle ranching and oil palm agro-industries. Pet trade may also pose imminent threats to wild populations of the Santa Marta white-fronted capuchin, especially in areas where tourism is widespread. IUCN redContinue reading “Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin Cebus malitiosus”

Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea

Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea Vulnerable Western pygmy marmoset Cebuella pygmaea Brazil; Colombia; Ecuador; Peru Eastern pygmy marmoset Cebuella niveiventris Brazil Pygmy Marmosets have undergone a population reduction suspected to be >30% over a three-generation period (18 years) due to a continuing decline in area, extent and quality of habitat from deforestation, mining,Continue reading “Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea”

Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla

Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla Extant (resident): Argentina; Bolivia; Brazil; Colombia; Costa Rica; Ecuador; French Guiana; Guyana; Honduras; Nicaragua; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Suriname; Venezuela Possibly Extinct: Argentina; Belize; El Salvador; Guatemala; Uruguay Vulnerable The Giant Anteater is at risk from habitat loss in parts of their range, and this is a significant threat to Central AmericanContinue reading “Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla”

Black Bearded Saki Chiropotes satanas

Black Bearded Saki Chiropotes satanas Brazil Endangered The greatest risks for the future survival of the Black Bearded Saki, also known as the Black Cuxiú are the loss and fragmentation of their habitat and hunting pressure. IUCN Red list They have the smallest range of the genus, which coincides with the most densely populated partContinue reading “Black Bearded Saki Chiropotes satanas”

Channel-billed Toucan Ramphastos vitellinus

Channel-billed Toucan Ramphastos vitellinus Vulnerable Brazil; Colombia; French Guiana; Guyana; Suriname; Trinidad and Tobago; Venezuela The primary threat to the Channel-billed Toucan is accelerating deforestation in the Amazon basin as land is cleared for cattle ranching, palm oil and soy production, facilitated by expansion of the road network (Soares-Filho et al. 2006, Bird et al.Continue reading “Channel-billed Toucan Ramphastos vitellinus”

Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda

Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda Peru Critically Endangered The Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey is listed as Critically Endangered due to a suspected population decline of greater than 80%, where the causes of reduction have not ceased, and is based on a corresponding decline of suitable, available habitat over the course of 50 years (ca 1985-2030;Continue reading “Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda”

These are the forgotten animals of the secretly destroyed forests

These brands have products that contain palm oil sourced from mills that are responsible for the destruction of precious habitats of endangered species. Therefore, these brands are directly involved in the extinction of hundreds of endangered species. Here are some palm oil free alternatives to buy instead.

Baird’s Tapir Tapirus bairdii

Baird’s Tapir Tapirus bairdii Endangered Extant (resident): Belize; Colombia; Costa Rica; Guatemala; Honduras; Mexico; Nicaragua; Panama Extinct: El Salvador Presence Uncertain: Ecuador Baird’s tapirs may look like they are relatives of elephants, but they’re actually closer kin to horses, donkeys, zebras, and rhinoceroses. The Baird’s Tapir is found in forested areas with ponds and streamsContinue reading “Baird’s Tapir Tapirus bairdii”

Varied White-fronted Capuchin Cebus versicolor

Varied White-fronted Capuchin Cebus versicolor Colombia Endangered Varied White-fronted Capuchin monkeys are gregarious and social animals that live in multi-male multi-female groups of approximately 20 individuals (including young), they are territorial and actively defends territories. Their main threats are agriculture, urban sprawl, deforestation, increasing energy matrix, increasing road matrix habitat fragmentation, habitat reduction, hunting, harvestingContinue reading “Varied White-fronted Capuchin Cebus versicolor”

Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus

Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus Brazil (Bahia, Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais) Endangered The crested capuchin or robust tufted capuchin (Sapajus robustus) is a species of robust capuchin monkey living in Brazil. They were formerly considered a subspecies of the black capuchin but is now considered to be a separate species. The species has a broad diet,Continue reading “Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus”

Ariel Toucan Ramphastos ariel

Ariel Toucan Ramphastos ariel Endangered Brazil No conservation The Ariel Toucan is one of the most iconic birds of the Amazon rainforest, depicted in countless pieces of art and historical renderings. They live in forested lowlands, most often near water, forest edge, swamp forest, clearings, riverine forest, patches in savannas, cerrado and riverine forest, upContinue reading “Ariel Toucan Ramphastos ariel”

Yucatán Black Howler Monkey Alouatta pigra

The extremely rare Pernambuco Pygmy-owl is critically endangered on the @IUCNredlist due to massive logging and deforestation for #palmoil #beef farming in #Brazil support this animal’s survival by making art and joining the #boycott4wildlife

Great Green Macaw Ara ambiguus

The extremely rare Pernambuco Pygmy-owl is critically endangered on the @IUCNredlist due to massive logging and deforestation for #palmoil #beef farming in #Brazil support this animal’s survival by making art and joining the #boycott4wildlife

Harlequin Poison Frog Oophaga histrionica

The enigmatic blue-billed curassow (Crax alberti – local name “Paujil”), endemic to the tropical humid forests of northern Colombia, is the cracid species most threatened with extinction in the wild from #deforestation