Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus

Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus

Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus

Kenya

Critically endangered

Tana River Mangabeys live in the flood-plain forest, riverine gallery forest, and the adjacent woodland and bushland of Kenya (Wieczkowski and Butynski 2013). Their abundance is highly correlated with the spatial characteristics of the forests (Wahungu et al. 2005). They are semi-terrestrial monkeys that can travel up to 1 km through non-forested habitat between forest patches (Wieczkowski 2010).

The rapid decline of Tana River Mangabeys has several causes including:

  • Drastic changes in vegetation due to dam construction, irrigation projects and water diversion, which affect both the water table and the frequency and severity of flooding which, in turn, affect the extent and quality of this species’ forest habitat.
  • Forest clearance for agriculture.
  • Fires that destroy forests.
  • Habitat degradation due to livestock.
  • The unsustainable collection of wood and other forest products.
  • Selective felling of fig trees for canoes.
  • Exploitation of one of the species’ top food plants, Phoenix reclinata.
  • Corruption, inter-ethnic violence and insecurity.

Tana River Mangabeys are intelligent forest-dwelling #primates critically endangered in #Kenya #Africa from #agriculture and #deforestation #Boycott4Wildlife at the supermarket

Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus
Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus

The rapid decline of Tana River Mangabeys has several causes including: Forest clearance for agriculture.

IUCN red list
The Tana river in Kenya home of the Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus
The Tana river in Kenya home of the Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus is being destroyed for agriculture

Support the conservation of this species

There are no known conservation activities for this species. Support this forgotten animal with your art! Submit to Creatives for Cool Creatures.

Further Information

iucn-rating-critically-endangered

Butynski, T.M., de Jong, Y.A., Wieczkowski, J. & King, J. 2020. Cercocebus galeritus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2020: e.T4200A17956330. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T4200A17956330.en. Downloaded on 26 March 2021.


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Published by Palm Oil Detectives

Hi, I’m Palm Oil Detective’s Editor in Chief. Palm Oil Detectives is partly a consumer website about palm oil in products and partly an online community for writers, scientists, conservationists, artists and musicians to showcase their work and express their love for endangered species. I have a strong voice for creatures great and small threatened by deforestation. With our collective power we can shift the greed of the retail and industrial agriculture sectors and through strong campaigning we can stop them cutting down forests. Be bold! Be courageous! Join the #Boycott4Wildlife and stand up for the animals with your supermarket choices

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