Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus

Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus Brazil (Bahia, Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais) Endangered The crested capuchin or robust tufted capuchin (Sapajus robustus) is a species of robust capuchin monkey living in Brazil. They were formerly considered a subspecies of the black capuchin but is now considered to be a separate species. The species has a broad diet,Continue reading “Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus”

Huge ecosystems could collapse in less than 50 years – new study

We know that ecosystems under stress can reach a point where they rapidly collapse into something very different. The clear water of a pristine lake can turn algae-green in a matter of months. In hot summers, a colourful coral reef can soon become bleached and virtually barren. And if a tropical forest has its canopyContinue reading “Huge ecosystems could collapse in less than 50 years – new study”

What’s my name? How wild parrots identify their young

Sunanda Creagh, The Conversation Wild parrots name their chicks by teaching them an individual sound to identify them, researchers have found. Humans and dolphins create unique sounds by which individuals are identified and there was some evidence to suggest captive parrots created ‘contact calls’ – special calls used to identify family and friends. But untilContinue reading “What’s my name? How wild parrots identify their young”

We don’t know how many mountain gorillas live in the wild. Here’s why

Katerina Guschanski, Uppsala University How important are the mountain gorillas of Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park to global populations? A new census – carried out by the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration (a coalition of governments, non-profits and conservationists) in 2018 – shows that the population of mountain gorillas in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest NationalContinue reading “We don’t know how many mountain gorillas live in the wild. Here’s why”

Southern Patas Monkey Erythrocebus baumstarki

Southern Patas Monkeys have a lanky and long-limbed appearance. Juveniles possess a reddish-brown crown which may become grey in adults. Their back and flanks are covered with shaggy reddish fur with their bellies are white or cream. There are sex differences and males are on average twice as large (4-7 kilos) as females. Southern Patas Monkeys are predominantly omnivores and feed on pods, seeds, gall, gum, flowers and young leaves acacia trees.

Nature’s hidden wealth is conservation’s missed opportunity

Australia has one of the worst extinction records in the modern world. Since European settlement, a third of the country’s native mammals have disappeared. How can we stem the losses? A recent article in Nature highlighted that most federal and state biodiversity conservation policy fails to recognise biodiversity as a major source of industrial products.Continue reading “Nature’s hidden wealth is conservation’s missed opportunity”

Golden-bellied Mangabey Cercocebus chrysogaster

Golden-bellied Mangabeys are only found in the Democratic Republic of Congo in tropical rainforests. They are known for their striking bright yellow and gold bellies which is easily distinguishable from their orange fur. They breed once per year, giving birth to one offspring that will not be fully independent until they are 4 to 5 years old. They are a nomadic, social species that travel in groups from 8 to 30 individuals. They have pouches in their cheeks which allow them to transport food.

Monkey minds: what we can learn from primate personality

Carla Litchfield, University of South Australia Every human is different. Some are outgoing, while others are reserved and shy. Some are focused and diligent, while others are haphazard and unfussed. Some people are curious, others avoid novelty and enjoy their rut. This is reflected in our personality, which is typically measured across five factors, knownContinue reading “Monkey minds: what we can learn from primate personality”

Saker Falcon Falco cherrug

The Sager Falcon is a majestic and powerful birds of prey that have a wide range throughout much of Southern Europe, the Middle East and parts of Africa. Their plumage ranges from chocolate brown in colour to a pale sandy with brown bars or streaks and can be snow white and off-white.

Humans force wild animals into tight spots, or send them far from home

The COVID pandemic has shown us that disruptions to the way we move around, complete daily activities and interact with each other can shatter our wellbeing. This doesn’t apply only to humans. Wildlife across the globe find themselves in this situation every day, irrespective of a global pandemic. Our latest research published today in NatureContinue reading “Humans force wild animals into tight spots, or send them far from home”

The Coronavirus Crisis: How has Lockdown Impacted Nature?

I think we can all agree that 2020 has been a very strange year. Thanks to coronavirus, modern life as we know it has been put on hold. International borders have been shut, governments have ordered businesses to close their doors, and most families have been under lockdown. For anyone wondering where this infectious virusContinue reading “The Coronavirus Crisis: How has Lockdown Impacted Nature?”

Drill Mandrillus leucophaeus

According to National Geographic, Drills are shy creatures that live in one small and remote area of Africa. Their faces aren’t as colourful as another species in their genus the Mandrill. Yet Drills still possess a dramatic appearance with pitch-black faces surrounded with a white fringe. Males have fatty cheek pads and a splash of red under their lower lips gives them the appearance of having broken into a makeup cabinet.

Rainbow Cliffs: Why Parrots in the Amazon Eat Clay

Our world holds a whole host of glorious natural spectacles, from great starling murmurations to the ethereal display of coral reef spawning. But to me, none is more thrilling than catching a glimpse of a majestic macaw. Screeching their way through the Amazon rainforest, leaving scattered fruit, broken branches, and a considerable quantity of parrotContinue reading “Rainbow Cliffs: Why Parrots in the Amazon Eat Clay”

Four-horned Chameleon Trioceros quadricornis

The main threat to this species is deforestation. Agricultural development extends as high as 1,700 m asl. near Nsoung village on Mt Manengouba (Gonwouo et al. 2006), and forest on the mountain’s southeast slope is rapidly disappearing (Gonwouo et al. 2006).

What would happen if we lost all wildlife?

Have you ever thought about what would happen if we lost all our wildlife? Thoughts on what our planet will turn into, always make my stomach hurt. Can you imagine having no wildlife anywhere? The scary rate that extinction is taking away our wildlife The rate is crazily high and we seem not to really understand howContinue reading “What would happen if we lost all wildlife?”

Ariel Toucan Ramphastos ariel

Ariel Toucan Ramphastos ariel Endangered Brazil No conservation The Ariel Toucan is one of the most iconic birds of the Amazon rainforest, depicted in countless pieces of art and historical renderings. They live in forested lowlands, most often near water, forest edge, swamp forest, clearings, riverine forest, patches in savannas, cerrado and riverine forest, upContinue reading “Ariel Toucan Ramphastos ariel”

Tana River Mangabey Cercocebus galeritus

The extremely rare Pernambuco Pygmy-owl is critically endangered on the @IUCNredlist due to massive logging and deforestation for #palmoil #beef farming in #Brazil support this animal’s survival by making art and joining the #boycott4wildlife

Dalida Innes

When I was a child, I used to play with a broken camera I dreamt that as an adult I would become a filmmaker and make animal documentaries, as I loved watching these shows as a child. Later when I started to work, initially I bought my first video camera but I quickly realised thatContinue reading “Dalida Innes”

Eastern Gorilla Gorilla beringei

Eastern Gorilla Gorilla beringei Critically Endangered Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Rwanda; Uganda Gorillas are some of the most powerful and striking animals in the world. Not only for their size and force, but also for their gentle human-like behavior. They play a crucial role in local biodiversity, roaming through large territories and helping,Continue reading “Eastern Gorilla Gorilla beringei”

Jo Frederiks

Jo Frederiks is a passionate animal rights advocate, speaking through her art to create awareness and inspire change to a vegan way of life. She is a full-time practising artist, exposing the well-hidden plight of animals we enslave, exploit and needlessly use for food, clothing, entertainment and research. Working in varying mediums, Frederiks favours graphite and oil paint. She has previously studied at The Arts Academy in Brisbane, graduating with Honours.