Sumatran elephants: Surrounded by palm oil and nobody knows how many are left alive!

Sumatran elephants in Indonesia’s North Aceh district are being increasingly encircled by shrinking patches of forest. Their home is being destroyed primarily for oil palm plantations.

Ongoing attempts of scientists to take a measure of their population have been hampered and oppressed by the Indonesian government, which has also attempted to prevent media coverage of the issue.

Between 924-1360 individual Sumatran elephants hang on for survival in Sumatra trapped on all sides by #palmoil #deforestation.
“Sustainable” palm oil is a lie. Fight for them and #Boycottpalmoil #Boycott4Wildlife

Bangka Slow Loris Nycticebus bancanus

This species was last reported from the wild in 1937. If the Bangka Slow Loris is still alive then the burning of their habitat and conversion to agriculture (especially to palm oil plantations) is their greatest threat. Bangka slow lorises are also threatened by exploitation and the illegal wildlife trade. However, this risk will be less since Bangka is relatively isolated from other Indonesian islands.

Fishing Cat Prionailurus viverrinus

Although they look cute and cuddly, the Fishing Cat Prionailurus viverrinus has a feisty, firecracker temper. This small to medium sized wild cat can become defensive if approached in the wild. They are around twice the size of a domestic cat and typically weigh around 5-16 kg and have stocky short legs and a short tail.

Their faces are round with their noses elongated, giving them a civet-like appearance, which is why their scientific name is viverrine. They are agile and fast hunters and can reach fast speeds in pursuit of prey. They have an average lifespan of approximately 12 years. Help them every time you shop and #Boycottpalmoil #Boycott4Wildlife

Helmeted Hornbill Rhinoplax vigil

Helmeted Hornbills are spectacular, large and intelligent birds native to SE Asia, known for their substantial helmet-like structure on their head called a casque made of ivory. This hefty head accounts for 11% of their 3kg body weight. They are found on the Malay Peninsula: Sumatra, Borneo, Myanmar and Thailand. They are critically endangered. Their main threats are illegal hunting and wildlife trade for their ivory casques along with palm oil and timber deforestation. Help them each time you shop and #Boycottpalmoil #Boycott4Wildlife

Land-grabbing and the climate crisis are strongly linked to palm oil

A corporate monopoly for control over land and resources for palm oil must be dismantled immediately to give humanity, animals and our natural world a fighting chance for survival and to reverse the climate crisis. In Asia, many indigenous peoples are now joining forces and rising up to resist this corruption and ecocide.

Papuan Eagle Harpyopsis novaeguineae

This powerful raptor has unusual proportions with a large prominent head, a powerful large bill and large eyes with piercing brown or orange irises. Their robust and chesty build tapers down to extremely elongated legs in a brown-grey or orange colour. As Papuan eagles age, the colour of their eyes becomes more vivid, with one 30 year old eagle possessing red eyes.

Endemic to West Papua and Papua New Guinea, the Papuan eagle was once found on every part of the island, however their range has decreased rapidly due to deforestation for palm oil, timber and mining. Their main habitat is undisturbed tropical rainforests, monsoon scrub forests, dry woodlands and in extremely rare cases, forest edges and they are found at elevations of up to 3,200 – 3,700 metres.

Celebrate #WorldRhinoDay by leaving the forests alone and #Boycottpalmoil to save imperilled Sumatran & Javan Rhinos

Indonesia manage to conserve two of the world’s five rhinoceros species. Both the Javan rhino Rhinoceros sondaicus and the Sumatran rhino Dicerorhinus sumatrensis still exist today, uniquely only in the country. Extractive industries and large-scale palm oil plantations have transformed the landscape of Sumatra. As a result, the Sumatran rhino’s populations were driven to theContinue reading “Celebrate #WorldRhinoDay by leaving the forests alone and #Boycottpalmoil to save imperilled Sumatran & Javan Rhinos”

Philippine Eagle Pithecophaga jefferyi

Philippine Eagles are classified as Critically Endangered due to enormous habitat decline and anthropogenic threats. There are estimated to be 180-600 eagles left in the wild. Forest destruction and fragmentation, through commercial timber extraction and shifting cultivation, is the principal long-term threat. Much of the land surrounding Davao has been converted from forest land to agricultural to grow banana, coffee, cacao, palm oil and another oil-producing plant called jatropha.

How do we protect the rapidly disappearing Javan Rhino?

With only 74 individuals left, the remarkable and beautiful Javan Rhino is on the brink of extinction and can be found on one of the most densely populated islands in the world – Java. Boycotting palm oil is how you can help them. Sunarto, Universitas Indonesia The Javan rhino was once found throughout many partsContinue reading “How do we protect the rapidly disappearing Javan Rhino?”

Knobbed Hornbill Rhyticeros cassidix

Knobbed Hornbill Rhyticeros cassidix Sulawesi, Indonesia Vulnerable Recent analysis has suggested that the Knobbed Hornbill may be declining at a rate approaching 40% over three generations based on recent and ongoing rates of habitat loss on Sulawesi (D. Holmes in litt. 1999, Kinnaird and O’Brien 2007). IUCN red list The Knobbed Hornbill is spectacular andContinue reading “Knobbed Hornbill Rhyticeros cassidix”

Binturong Arctictis binturong

Binturong Arctictis binturong Bangladesh; Bhutan; Cambodia; China; India; Indonesia (Kalimantan, Jawa, Sumatera); Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Malaysia (Sarawak, Sabah, Peninsular Malaysia); Myanmar; Nepal; Philippines; Thailand; Vietnam Presence Uncertain: Brunei Darussalam Vulnerable Habitat loss has been the predominant driver of decline of the Binturong’s southern (Sundaic) portion of the range, where a significant proportion of lowlandContinue reading “Binturong Arctictis binturong”

Sulawesi Hornbill Rhabdotorrhinus exarhatus

Sulawesi Hornbill Rhabdotorrhinus exarhatus Indonesia Vulnerable The Sulawesi Hornbill is threatened with habitat destruction, with forest on Sulawesi being lost at a rate of 16.9% per ten years during 1985-1997; and 36.1% per ten years during 1997-2001 (based on D. A. Holmes in litt. 1999 and Kinnaird and O’Brien 2007). The species’s specialised breeding requirementsContinue reading “Sulawesi Hornbill Rhabdotorrhinus exarhatus”

Marbled Cat Pardofelis marmorata

Marbled Cat Pardofelis marmorata Bangladesh; Bhutan; Brunei Darussalam; Cambodia; China; India; Indonesia (Kalimantan, Sumatera); Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Malaysia (Sarawak, Sabah, Peninsular Malaysia); Myanmar; Nepal; Thailand; Vietnam Near Threatened Southeast Asia has one of the highest and fastest deforestation rates mainly due to logging and forest conversion for human settlements, agriculture, oil palm, coffee, rubberContinue reading “Marbled Cat Pardofelis marmorata”

Leopard Panthera pardus

Leopard Panthera pardus Vulnerable Living: (Parts of) Central and Southern Africa, The Middle East, Southern Asia, Indonesia, Malaysia. Possibly Extinct: Gambia; Israel; Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of; Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Lesotho; Tajikistan; Viet Nam Extinct: Hong Kong; Jordan; Korea, Republic of; Kuwait; Lebanon; Mauritania; Morocco; Singapore; Syrian Arab Republic; Togo; Tunisia; United Arab Emirates;Continue reading “Leopard Panthera pardus”

King Cobra Ophiophagus hannah

King Cobra Ophiophagus hannah Vulnerable Malaysia, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India The King Cobra lives in a variety of habitats, primarily in pristine forests, but they can also be found in degraded forest, mangrove swamps and even agricultural areas with remnants of woodland. They have also been found swimming in rivers in non-forested landContinue reading “King Cobra Ophiophagus hannah”

Spectral Tarsier Tarsius tarsier

Spectral Tarsier Tarsius tarsier Vulnerable Sulawesi, Indonesia These adaptable creatures are able to cling and leap in the understory of suitable tropical habitats, often two meters or less from the ground. Nocturnal social primates, the Spectral Tarsier likely live in small, monogamous or polygamous groupings of up to 26 individuals, although further study is needed.Continue reading “Spectral Tarsier Tarsius tarsier”

Bengal Slow Loris Nycticebus bengalensis

Bengal Slow Loris Nycticebus bengalensis Endangered Malaysia, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Bangladesh The Bengal Slow Loris are wide-eyed beauties that are arboreal and nocturnal and live in tropical evergreen rainforest, semi-evergreen forest, and mixed deciduous forest. In Vietnam they are found only in secondary forests, and on the edge of primary forests; the species alsoContinue reading “Bengal Slow Loris Nycticebus bengalensis”

Wrinkled Hornbill Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus

Wrinkled Hornbill Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus Endangered Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Brunei Extinct: Singapore The Wrinkled Hornbill is a magnificent and ancient looking bird that lives in primary evergreen and swamp forests up to 1,000 m. They can live in selectively logged forest if primary forests are adjacent, but they do not occur in secondary forest. Forest firesContinue reading “Wrinkled Hornbill Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus”

Storm’s Stork Ciconia stormi

Storm’s Stork Ciconia stormi Endangered Malaysia, Borneo, Indonesia, Brunei, Thailand The Storm’s Stork occurs at low densities in large, undisturbed blocks of level lowland forest, particularly freshwater and peat-swamp forests, on the floodplains of large rivers. They also frequent disturbed, recently burned and logged areas, and occasionally areas subject to tidal movements, although these mayContinue reading “Storm’s Stork Ciconia stormi”

Wild Water Buffalo Bubalus arnee

Wild Water Buffalo Bubalus arnee Endangered India, Nepal, all South East Asia The Wild Water Buffalo is very dependent on the availability of water and historically their preferred habitats were low-lying alluvial grasslands including bheels (ox-bow lakes and similar pools left by changing river courses) and their surrounds; river banks, and chaporis (small sandy islandsContinue reading “Wild Water Buffalo Bubalus arnee”