Chimpanzees once helped African rainforests recover from a major collapse

Most people probably think that the rainforest of central and west Africa, the second largest in the world, has been around for millions of years. However recent research suggests that it is mostly just 2,000 or so years old. The forest reached roughly its modern state following five centuries of regeneration after it was massivelyContinue reading “Chimpanzees once helped African rainforests recover from a major collapse”

Primates are facing an impending extinction crisis – but we know very little about what will actually protect them

From lemurs to orangutans, tarsiers to gorillas, primates are captivating and sometimes unnervingly similar to us. So it’s not surprising that this group of more than 500 species receives a great deal of research and conservation attention. But despite this effort, more than 60% of primate species are threatened with extinction mainly due to humanContinue reading “Primates are facing an impending extinction crisis – but we know very little about what will actually protect them”

Bonobos can inspire us to make our democracies more peaceful

Bonobos, sometimes called the “forgotten ape” due to their recent discovery and small numbers, titillate the democrat’s imagination. Before the 1970s, certain primatologists thought bonobos were strange chimpanzees because females govern in this primate society. Frans de Waal, the primatologist and popular writer, has done much to explain the fascinating lives of these “peace-loving apes”Continue reading “Bonobos can inspire us to make our democracies more peaceful”

Research: Small room for compromise between oil palm cultivation and primate conservation in Africa

Research by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission found that although oil palm cultivation represents an important source of income for many tropical countries, its future expansion is a primary threat to tropical forests and biodiversity. In this context, and especially in regions where industrial palm oil production is still emerging, identifying “areasContinue reading “Research: Small room for compromise between oil palm cultivation and primate conservation in Africa”

Contagious yawns show social ties in humans and bonobos

Penny Orbell, The Conversation Most of us have experienced the overwhelming urge to yawn in response to another person yawning – but we’re not the only species to do this. Research published in PeerJ today shows bonobos – our closest evolutionary cousins – also experience “yawn contagion”, and, as in humans, the effect is influencedContinue reading “Contagious yawns show social ties in humans and bonobos”

Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis

Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis Extant (resident) Ecuador; Peru Critically Endangered The Ecuardorian White-fronted Capuchin is affected by deforestation and hunting for bushmeat and the pet trade. Forests in the western lowlands of Ecuador have been severely reduced in the past half-century (Dodson and Gentry 1991, Sierra 2013, Gonzalez-Jaramillo 2016). Where habitat loss has fragmentedContinue reading “Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis”

Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin Cebus malitiosus

Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin Cebus malitiosus Endangered Colombia The Santa Marta white-fronted capuchin is threatened in Colombia by habitat loss and fragmentation due to cattle ranching and oil palm agro-industries. Pet trade may also pose imminent threats to wild populations of the Santa Marta white-fronted capuchin, especially in areas where tourism is widespread. IUCN redContinue reading “Santa Marta White-fronted Capuchin Cebus malitiosus”

For primates, having a mother helps them learn social skills

Carla Litchfield, University of South Australia Wild bonobos, like all Great Apes, spend long childhoods with their mothers, learning the skills they need to function as socially and emotionally stable members of their community. But orphaned bonobos at sanctuaries don’t have that kind of upbringing. Can they still learn the skills they need to getContinue reading “For primates, having a mother helps them learn social skills”

Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea

Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea Vulnerable Western pygmy marmoset Cebuella pygmaea Brazil; Colombia; Ecuador; Peru Eastern pygmy marmoset Cebuella niveiventris Brazil Pygmy Marmosets have undergone a population reduction suspected to be >30% over a three-generation period (18 years) due to a continuing decline in area, extent and quality of habitat from deforestation, mining,Continue reading “Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea”

Black Bearded Saki Chiropotes satanas

Black Bearded Saki Chiropotes satanas Brazil Endangered The greatest risks for the future survival of the Black Bearded Saki, also known as the Black Cuxiú are the loss and fragmentation of their habitat and hunting pressure. IUCN Red list They have the smallest range of the genus, which coincides with the most densely populated partContinue reading “Black Bearded Saki Chiropotes satanas”

Primatologist Cleve Hicks: On chimpanzee cultures, veganism and how consumers can help save the world

Dr Hicks speaks with Palm Oil Detectives about his chimpanzee research, veganism, deforestation, palm oil and what consumers can do to help the endangered animals of Africa.

Wildlife Photographer Craig Jones: In His Own Words

Bio: Craig Jones One of Britain’s finest wildlife photographers, Craig Jones is also one of the most humble and down-to-earth guys you will ever meet. His photography and stories capture the lives of endangered rainforest animals that we hold so dearly to our hearts: Sumatran orangutans, Sumatran tigers, Sumatran elephants, Siamangs and more. His workContinue reading “Wildlife Photographer Craig Jones: In His Own Words”

Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda

Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda Peru Critically Endangered The Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey is listed as Critically Endangered due to a suspected population decline of greater than 80%, where the causes of reduction have not ceased, and is based on a corresponding decline of suitable, available habitat over the course of 50 years (ca 1985-2030;Continue reading “Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda”

Western Lowland Gorilla Gorilla gorilla

Western Lowland Gorilla Gorilla gorilla Critically Endangered Angola (Cabinda); Cameroon; Central African Republic; Congo; Equatorial Guinea (Equatorial Guinea (mainland)); Gabon; Nigeria Habitat loss is emerging as a major threat to Western Gorillas. Other threats include disease and poaching. As oil-palm plantations in Asia reach capacity, Africa is becoming the new frontier for this crop, offeringContinue reading “Western Lowland Gorilla Gorilla gorilla”

Golden Monkey Cercopithecus mitis ssp. kandti

The Democratic Republic of the Congo; Rwanda; Uganda Endangered Golden Monkey Cercopithecus mitis ssp. kandti The Golden monkey Cercopithecus kandti are Old World monkeys that live nestled deeply into the Virunga volcanic mountains of Central Africa. They are found in four national parks: Mgahinga, in south-west Uganda; Volcanoes, in north-west Rwanda; and Virunga and Kahuzi-Biéga,Continue reading “Golden Monkey Cercopithecus mitis ssp. kandti”

Eyewitness by Craig Jones: A mother and baby orangutan are rescued from an RSPO palm oil plantation in Sumatra

Bio: Craig Jones One of Britain’s finest wildlife photographers, Craig Jones is also one of the most humble and down-to-earth guys you will ever meet. His photography and stories capture the lives of endangered rainforest animals that we hold so dearly to our hearts: Sumatran orangutans, Sumatran tigers, Sumatran elephants, Siamangs and more. His workContinue reading “Eyewitness by Craig Jones: A mother and baby orangutan are rescued from an RSPO palm oil plantation in Sumatra”

Dusky Langur Trachypithecus obscurus

Dusky Langur Trachypithecus obscurus Endangered Malaysia; Myanmar; Thailand Hunting for food is a major threat, as is fragmentation, habitat loss and degradation due to expanding oil palm plantations, agriculture, urbanization, and touristic development (Groves et al. 2013). In Peninsular Malaysia the langurs are frequent victims of road-kill (Boonratana 2003). IUCN Red list Playful, gregarious andContinue reading “Dusky Langur Trachypithecus obscurus”

Varied White-fronted Capuchin Cebus versicolor

Varied White-fronted Capuchin Cebus versicolor Colombia Endangered Varied White-fronted Capuchin monkeys are gregarious and social animals that live in multi-male multi-female groups of approximately 20 individuals (including young), they are territorial and actively defends territories. Their main threats are agriculture, urban sprawl, deforestation, increasing energy matrix, increasing road matrix habitat fragmentation, habitat reduction, hunting, harvestingContinue reading “Varied White-fronted Capuchin Cebus versicolor”

Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus

Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus Brazil (Bahia, Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais) Endangered The crested capuchin or robust tufted capuchin (Sapajus robustus) is a species of robust capuchin monkey living in Brazil. They were formerly considered a subspecies of the black capuchin but is now considered to be a separate species. The species has a broad diet,Continue reading “Crested Capuchin Sapajus robustus”

We don’t know how many mountain gorillas live in the wild. Here’s why

Katerina Guschanski, Uppsala University How important are the mountain gorillas of Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park to global populations? A new census – carried out by the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration (a coalition of governments, non-profits and conservationists) in 2018 – shows that the population of mountain gorillas in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest NationalContinue reading “We don’t know how many mountain gorillas live in the wild. Here’s why”