Giant Otter Pteronura brasiliensis

The agile and graceful tumbling Olympians of the Amazonian rivers, Giant Otters are able to swim 100 metres in less than 30 seconds. They are also known as the Lobo de Rio (the River wolf), Los Lobos del Rio (Wolves of the River) and Ariranha. They are most active in the mornings and evenings and take a siesta during the hottest parts of the day.

The most significant threats to giant otters are anthropogenic pressures of deforestation for palm oil, soy and meat, pollution from mining and climate change. They are also illegally hunted and traded for their pelts or killed in retribution by fishermen.

Jaguar Panthera onca

Jaguar populations are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation for palm oil, soy and meat along with illegal murder for trophies/illegal trade in body parts. They are also the victims of pro-active or retaliatory killings associated with livestock depredation and competition for wild meat with human hunters.

Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis

Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis Extant (resident) Ecuador; Peru Critically Endangered The Ecuardorian White-fronted Capuchin is affected by deforestation and hunting for bushmeat and the pet trade. Forests in the western lowlands of Ecuador have been severely reduced in the past half-century (Dodson and Gentry 1991, Sierra 2013, Gonzalez-Jaramillo 2016). Where habitat loss has fragmentedContinue reading “Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin Cebus aequatorialis”

Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea

Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea Vulnerable Western pygmy marmoset Cebuella pygmaea Brazil; Colombia; Ecuador; Peru Eastern pygmy marmoset Cebuella niveiventris Brazil Pygmy Marmosets have undergone a population reduction suspected to be >30% over a three-generation period (18 years) due to a continuing decline in area, extent and quality of habitat from deforestation, mining,Continue reading “Pygmy Marmoset Cebuella niveiventris and Cebuella pygmaea”

Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla

Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla Extant (resident): Argentina; Bolivia; Brazil; Colombia; Costa Rica; Ecuador; French Guiana; Guyana; Honduras; Nicaragua; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Suriname; Venezuela Possibly Extinct: Argentina; Belize; El Salvador; Guatemala; Uruguay Vulnerable The Giant Anteater is at risk from habitat loss in parts of their range, and this is a significant threat to Central AmericanContinue reading “Giant Anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla”

Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda

Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda Peru Critically Endangered The Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey is listed as Critically Endangered due to a suspected population decline of greater than 80%, where the causes of reduction have not ceased, and is based on a corresponding decline of suitable, available habitat over the course of 50 years (ca 1985-2030;Continue reading “Peruvian Yellow-tailed Woolly Monkey Lagothrix flavicauda”

Bald-headed Uacari Cacajao calvus

Bald-headed Uacari Cacajao calvus Vulnerable Brazil, Peru, Colombia With their long shaggy coats and striking bright red faces, Bald-headed Uacaris are true icons of the Amazon rainforest and are found in Brazil, Peru and Colombia. When an Uacari has a bright red face this indicates good health, a pale face indicates a sickly physical state.Continue reading “Bald-headed Uacari Cacajao calvus”