Giant Otter Pteronura brasiliensis

The agile and graceful tumbling Olympians of the Amazonian rivers, Giant Otters are able to swim 100 metres in less than 30 seconds. They are also known as the Lobo de Rio (the River wolf), Los Lobos del Rio (Wolves of the River) and Ariranha. They are most active in the mornings and evenings and take a siesta during the hottest parts of the day.

The most significant threats to giant otters are anthropogenic pressures of deforestation for palm oil, soy and meat, pollution from mining and climate change. They are also illegally hunted and traded for their pelts or killed in retribution by fishermen.

Channel-billed Toucan Ramphastos vitellinus

Channel-billed Toucan Ramphastos vitellinus Vulnerable Brazil; Colombia; French Guiana; Guyana; Suriname; Trinidad and Tobago; Venezuela The primary threat to the Channel-billed Toucan is accelerating deforestation in the Amazon basin as land is cleared for cattle ranching, palm oil and soy production, facilitated by expansion of the road network (Soares-Filho et al. 2006, Bird et al.Continue reading “Channel-billed Toucan Ramphastos vitellinus”